Patient Safety

Marilyn Neder Flack Appointed to PPAHS’s Board of Advisors

The Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety (PPAHS) is very pleased to announce that Marilyn Neder Flack, who was the Senior Vice President, Patient Safety Initiatives at the Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation (AAMI) and Executive Director at the AAMI Foundation, has been appointed to PPAHS’s board of advisors.

During her tenure at AAMI, Ms. Flack’s spearheaded key patient safety initiatives, including clinical alarm management, continuous electronic monitoring of patients on opioids, home healthcare technology, safe infusion therapy safety, and the safe use of complex health technology.

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Opioid Safety, Respiratory Compromise

Only Continuous Electronic Monitoring Can Ensure Patients Receiving Opioids Are Safe AAMI Video to Keep Patients and Their Families Safe

With the permission of the Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation (AAMI), the Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety (PPAHS) is pleased to release the AAMI video on how to keep patients and their families safe, “Only Continuous Electronic Monitoring Can Ensure Patients Receiving Opioids Are Safe.”

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Patient Safety, Practices & Tips

Selecting Patient Monitoring Systems Clinical Education Podcast on Wearable, Contact-Free, and Continuous Vital Sign Patient Monitoring

The Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety released a clinical education podcast – Selecting Patient Monitoring Systems.

“We are often asked by our clinical followers what patient monitoring systems that we would recommend,” said Michael Wong, JD (Founder/Executives Director). “To help with their decision making process, we have produced a clinical education podcast to provide some guidance on selecting patient monitoring devices.”

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Opioid Safety

How Nurses Can Fight The Opioid Epidemic

In this article published in the February 2018 issue of Hospital News, Michael Wong, JD (Founder and Executive Director, Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety) discusses how nurses can fight the opioid epidemic. Mr. Wong cites resources, such as the PCA Safety Checklist, and harm reduction principles set forth in the Canadian Nurses Association paper, “Harm Reduction & Illicit Substance Use: Implications for Nursing.”

The US and Canada are both battling the opioid epidemic. As Michael Wong, JD (Founder & Executive Director, Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety) writes in the article, “How Nurses Can Fight The Opioid Epidemic”:

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Patient Safety

COPD’s Role in Respiratory Compromise PPAHS Clinical Education Podcast to Focus on COPD’s Role in Respiratory Compromise

The Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety (PPAHS) announced its intention to broaden its discussion of respiratory compromise to include non-opioid-related issues and COPD’s role in respiratory compromise.

Michael Wong, JD (Founder and Executive Director, PPAHS) explained that a discussion of COPD’s role in respiratory compromise is a natural progression of PPAHS initiative in growing awareness of this critical patient safety issue:

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Opioid Safety, Patient Safety, Respiratory Compromise

Preventing Avoidable Deaths PPAHS Interviews Dr. Frank Overdyk on Preventing Avoidable Deaths & Monitoring For Respiratory Compromise

In a clinical education podcast, Frank Overdyk, MD, who is an anesthesiologist practicing in Charleston, SC, discusses preventing avoidable deaths and the costs of monitoring patients receiving opioids and the costs of not being monitored. It is impossible to predict with 100% accuracy how a particular patient will react when administered an opioid. Continuous patient monitoring, which costs just $20-$30 per day in the case of monitoring with pulse oximetry, is a small price to pay to help prevent avoidable patient deaths.

By Michael Wong, JD (Founder/Executive Director, Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety)

I recently interviewed Frank Overdyk, MD, who is an anesthesiologist practicing in Charleston, SC, about the costs of monitoring patients receiving opioids and the costs of not being monitored. Dr. Overdyk is a member of board of advisors of the Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety and organized the two conferences on opioid-induced respiratory depression (“OIRD”) for the Anesthesia Patient Safety Foundation.

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Opioid Safety

Opioid Safety in America Check lawsuits involving prescription medication

In this article, Cal Cook (Consumer Finance Investigator, ConsumerSafety.Org) discusses resources for opioid safety, including checking lawsuits involving prescription medication.

By Cal Cook (Consumer Finance Investigator, ConsumerSafety.Org) investigates and writes about consumer-focused topics including finance, scams and safety. His passion lies in exposing fraud across all industries to protect consumers.

If you’re an American reading this, you’ve probably heard over the course of the last year or two how the opioid epidemic is getting out of hand. Nearly 70,000 people overdosed in 2017, making this epidemic even more deadly than breast cancer for the year.

Not all of those deaths were directly attributable to prescription medication, but many of the victims started with pills their doctor prescribed and went on to heroin and Fentanyl once they were addicted, because the more dangerous street drugs are cheaper.

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Patient Safety

What safety issues do you want to hear more about? PPAHS Safety Issues Poll

What safety issues do you want to hear more about? Please help us help you by taking our Safety Issues Poll.

Please check all of the issues that you want to hear more about and write in any others that we have not listed.

Opioid Safety, Respiratory Compromise

5 Facts that Makes Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea More At-Risk for Death Research shows respiratory compromise may occur with obstructive sleep apnea patients receiving opioids

Researchers have found that respiratory compromise may occur with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients receiving opioids.

Research conducted by Yamini Subramani, MD et al, “Death or near-death in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea: a compendium of case reports of critical complications” found 5 reasons why the risk of death is higher in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA).

After removing for duplicates, the researchers analyzed more than 1,000 patient cases.

# 1 Fact – Patients can have obstructive sleep apnea and not know it

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