Blood Clots

PPAHS Participates in 1st Annual Anticoagulation Summit

Patient advocates and leading medical societies involved in awareness building and improving patient safety in Atrial Fibrillation (Afib) and venous thromboembolism (VTE) gathered recently for the 1st Annual Anticoagulation Summit, a two-day conference.

Michael Wong, JD, founder and Executive Director of the Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety (PPAHS), presented a poster on the OB VTE Safety Recommendations, which were released by PPAHS, in collaboration with the Institute for Healthcare Improvement and the National Perinatal Association. The recommendations, compiled by a panel of health experts, give clinicians a step-by-step checklist to help assess all OB patients’ risks for VTE and identify the appropriate prophylaxis regimen to improve health outcomes for maternal patients. Read More

Patient Safety

An Interview With The Creator Of PatientAider: Navigating the World of Hospitals and Healthcare

By Michael Wong, JD (founder and executive director, the Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety)

Often times, as a patient, the hospital and its staff can be a bewildering and seemingly unfriendly environment; processes, procedures, and even the language spoken can truly be confusing. In a recent NY Times article, “In the Hospital, a Degrading Shift From Person to Patient”, Benedict Carey writes:

Entering the medical system, whether a hospital, a nursing home or a clinic, is often degrading… at many others the small courtesies that help lubricate and dignify civil society are neglected precisely when they are needed most, when people are feeling acutely cut off from others and betrayed by their own bodies.

To help navigate this world of hospitals and healthcare, I recently spoke with Mari Miceli. Mari has worked over 15 years as a registered nurse after graduating from the University of Massachusetts, Lowell with a BS in Nursing and the University of Illinois with a BFA. in Industrial Design. She is also a Regional Network Chair, a volunteer position at the Patient Safety Movement Foundation. Read More

Hospital Acquired Conditions, Patient Safety

Reducing Obstetric Malpractice Claims Starts With Training, Communication, and Culture

Michael Wong, JD (Founder and Executive Director, Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety).

Can “perfect care” exist in the clinical setting? This is one of the questions that was asked at a recent conference that I spoke at with Bruce Pastner, MD, JD (Vice-Chair, Patient Safety & Quality, Inova Fairfax Women’s Hospital).

It’s a utopic vision for patient safety that we all strive for. But the unfortunate reality of healthcare today is that bad outcomes can happen; this is sadly true in practices regarded as higher-risk, such as obstetrics. Not all terrible events leading to death or major injury are predictable, preventable, or even treatable. What clinicians can do, however, is to focus on identifying the most preventable incidents and prepare for them. Read More

Patient Safety

Physician-Patient Alliance Appoints Communications Director

The Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety (PPAHS) would like to formally announce that Nicholas Wong has been appointed as Director, Communications.

Some readers of the PPAHS blog may have noticed that, over the past year, Nicholas has appeared alongside Sean (Community Manager) and Michael (Executive Director) as an article author. As Communications Director, he will be driving our communication strategy. Read More

Must Reads

Patient Safety Weekly Must Reads (June 3, 2017)

This week in #patientsafety, PPAHS announced our position that all patients receiving opioids must be monitored with capnography. From around the web, the American Journal of Nursing summarized venous thromboembolism (blood clots) guidelines from American College of Chest Physicians, Ontario released a dataset and tool to explore opioid-related morbidity and mortality, and Pain Medicine News discussed a researcher’s exploration of alternatives to opioids. Read More

Opioid Safety, Position Statement, Respiratory Compromise

Patients Receiving Opioids Must Be Monitored With Continuous Electronic Monitoring

The following is a position statement published by PPAHS. If you would prefer to view our statement as a PDF, please click here.

Much of the public attention has been focused on the harm caused by prescription use and abuse of opioids. However, there is another facet that must be focused on: opioid-induced respiratory depression in clinical settings. This includes patients undergoing moderate and conscious sedation, or recovering from procedures and managing pain using a patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) pump, particularly those during the postoperative period. Read More

Must Reads

Patient Safety Weekly Must Reads (May 27, 2017)

This week in #patientsafety, PPAHS archived select articles that we were able to get featured on Advance for Nurses. From around the web, Italy’s lawmakers recognized patient safety as a fundamental right, Health Quality Ontario released a report on opioids in the Canadian province, and research from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine shows earlier is better when it comes to sepsis treatment. Read More

Must Reads

Patient Safety Weekly Must Reads (May 20, 2017)

This week in #patientsafety, PPAHS offered a look at the differences in anesthesiology standards between hospital and outpatient settings. From around the web, an infographic on blood clots, a look at how medical students are trained on the opioid crisis, and an alert in a small Canadian town experiencing the worst of the opioid epidemic. Read More

Hospital Acquired Conditions, Opioid Safety, Respiratory Compromise

Anesthesiology Standards Shouldn’t be Different in Hospital and Outpatient Settings

Written by Lynn Razzano RN, MSN, ONC-C (Clinical Nurse Consultant, Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety).

When preventable medical errors occur, one of the very first questions asked by patients, families, the legal system, the press, and the public is: “were appropriate care standards met?”. As a professional Registered Nurse, I look at this question from a quality and patient safety perspective to ask what could have been done differently? What are the best practice medical standards, and why are they not applied across the US health care systems? How applicable should the medical standard of care be? And how do we, as clinicians and patient advocates, define the best practice standard of care?

The reality is that the definition of best practice and standard of care differs between acute care hospital settings and outpatient surgery centers. And, even then, the standard of care being applied by the ambulatory surgical center, anesthesiologist and the gastroenterologist may not be the same. Read More

Opioid Safety

Patient Safety Weekly Must Reads (May 13, 2017)

This week in #patientsafety, PPAHS featured a video about Tyler, an 18-year-old who survived the surgery for a collapsed lung but not the recovery. He was receiving opioids via PCA pump and was found dead in bed. From around the web, two Canadian patient safety organizations are trying to measure patient harm in hospitals, a biochemist from the University of Colorado looks at NSAIDs and sepsis, and an answer to whether a stroke patient should be driven to the hospital. Read More