Blood Clots

Birth Control Pills Who Is At Risk for Blood Clots?

Editor’s note: In this editorial from the desk of PPAHS’s Executive Director, to help prevent blood clots PPAHS says that clinicians and their patients need to know who is at risk and be knowledgeable about the alternatives.

By Michael Wong, JD (Founder/Executive Director, Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety)

Birth Control Pills and Blood Clots 

Two women – one in the United States and one in Ireland – both recently experienced near-death experiences. Despite being separated by the Atlantic Ocean, both share a widespread practice – they both were taking birth control pills. According to a survey by the CDC, 62% of women of reproductive age are currently using contraception.

In the United States, WREG 3 News reports that 18-year-old Hailey Duncan from Memphis, Tennessee “was rushed to Baptist after she suffered a pulmonary embolism likely caused by birth control pills that blocked off most of the blood flow to her lungs. She went into cardiac arrest several times on the way to the hospital.”

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Blood Clots

Maternal Death: the Rising National Crisis of Maternal Morbidity and Mortality

In this article, Niran S. Al-Agba, MD (Mom, pediatrician, and Associate Editor at The Deductible); Michael Wong, JD (Executive Director, Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety) and John Bianchi (Vice President, Finn Partners) discuss the maternal morbidity and mortality epidemic in the US. Seeking to stem this epidemic, The Preventing Maternal Deaths Act was recently signed into law.

Now, the question is how to reduce the national crisis of maternal morbidity and mortality. To reverse increasing maternal mortality, prioritizing venous thromboembolism — the leading medical cause of maternal death in pregnancy — will help lower maternal morbidity and mortality.

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Blood Clots

Early Detection of AFib: Empowering Patients Patients Should Ask to Be Screened for AFib

PPAHS is proud to support and participate in WomenHeart’s National AFib Month Screening Campaign. PPAHS asks clinicians to please screen for AFib.

By WomenHeart (WomenHeart: The National Coalition for Women with Heart Disease, is a nonprofit, 501(c)(3) patient advocacy organization with thousands of members nationwide, including women heart patients and their families, health care providers, advocates and consumers committed to helping women live longer, healthier lives. WomenHeart supports, educates and advocates on behalf of the nearly 48 million American women living with or at risk of heart disease.)

Approximately 1.5 million American women live with atrial fibrillation (AFib), which is an irregular heartbeat. One of the most effective means of detection of AFib is through “opportunistic screenings” with primary care providers, these screenings identify more people with AFib than arranged screenings.

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Blood Clots

Atrial Fibrillation: Early Detection and Risk Reduction

In this guest post by Drs. Nidhi Madan and Annabelle Volgman discuss why early detection of AFib can lead to a significant reduction of risk.

Nidhi Madan, MD, MPH; Annabelle S. Volgman, MD, FACC, FAHA 

Atrial fibrillation (AFib) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia, with its prevalence projected to increase from 5.2 million in 2010 to 12.1 million cases in 2030 in the United States.1 AFib confers a higher risk of stroke, heart failure, cognitive decline and mortality.2,3 Early identification of AFib is imperative to reduce morbidity and mortality. Several factors cause structural and electrical remodeling of the atria resulting in AFIB. Established non-modifiable risk factors for AFib include advanced age and male sex. Female sex is a risk factor for strokes for patients with AFib. Other modifiable risk factors include smoking, alcohol use, obesity, diabetes, hypertension, sleep apnea, myocardial infarction, valve disease and heart failure.

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Blood Clots

Participate in WomenHeart’s National AFib Month Screening Campaign Clinicians Please Screen for AFib

PPAHS is proud to support and participate in WomenHeart’s National AFib Month Screening Campaign. PPAHS asks clinicians to please screen for AFib.

By WomenHeart (WomenHeart: The National Coalition for Women with Heart Disease, is a nonprofit, 501(c)(3) patient advocacy organization with thousands of members nationwide, including women heart patients and their families, health care providers, advocates and consumers committed to helping women live longer, healthier lives. WomenHeart supports, educates and advocates on behalf of the nearly 48 million American women living with or at risk of heart disease.)

Studies show that early detection of AFib can reduce an individual’s risk of stroke by as much as 60 percent. WomenHeart: The National Coalition for Women with Heart Disease, is launching the “Nationwide AFib Month Opportunistic Screening Initiative.”

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Blood Clots, Patient Safety

National Patient Safety Goal to Reduce the Patient Harm from Anticoagulants OB VTE and Stroke VTE Safety Recommendations now World Thrombosis Day Resources

Anticoagulants (more commonly referred to as blood thinners) are routinely used to treat, prevent and reduce the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE), which consists of prevent deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE).

According to World Thrombosis Day, 1 in 4 people worldwide are dying from conditions caused by thrombosis:

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Blood Clots, Practices & Tips

How to Prevent Deadly Blood Clots: Three Free Resources from the Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety World Thromobosis Day asks us to be aware of tips to prevent deadly blood clots

How to Prevent Deadly Blood Clots: Three Free Resources from the Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety

World Thrombosis Day asks us to be aware of tips to prevent deadly blood clots:

When you think of potentially deadly health issues, do you think of a blood clot? According to a recent U.S. survey, only 7 percent of people say they are concerned about blood clots, known by the medical term thrombosis. However, what they might not know is one in four people worldwide die from conditions caused by thrombosis, making it a leading cause of global death and disability.

In honor of WTD 2017, the Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety believes that blood clots safety consists of four steps: Read More

Blood Clots

PPAHS Participates in 1st Annual Anticoagulation Summit

Patient advocates and leading medical societies involved in awareness building and improving patient safety in Atrial Fibrillation (Afib) and venous thromboembolism (VTE) gathered recently for the 1st Annual Anticoagulation Summit, a two-day conference.

Michael Wong, JD, founder and Executive Director of the Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety (PPAHS), presented a poster on the OB VTE Safety Recommendations, which were released by PPAHS, in collaboration with the Institute for Healthcare Improvement and the National Perinatal Association. The recommendations, compiled by a panel of health experts, give clinicians a step-by-step checklist to help assess all OB patients’ risks for VTE and identify the appropriate prophylaxis regimen to improve health outcomes for maternal patients. Read More

Blood Clots

March is Blood Clot Awareness Month

Blood Clot Awareness Month logo

March is Blood Clot Awareness Month.

Spearheaded by the National Blood Clot Alliance, #BCAM is a time for patients, caregivers, healthcare professionals, and advocates to draw attention to deep vein thrombosis and venous thromboembolism.

According to the National Blood Clot Alliance:

“Blood clots do not discriminate. They can and do affect anyone from children to senior citizens, from professional athletes to mothers, women and men – no one is immune. Tragically, roughly 274 lives are lost each day in the U.S. simply because public awareness about life-threatening blood clots is so low.”

Blood Clot Awareness Month is a time for us to highlight stories and resources that you can share with colleagues, patients, and loved ones to bring attention to blood clots. Read More