Patient Safety

Memories of Gina Pugliese – A Relentless Advocate for Patient Safety A Personal Reflection on Why We Must Do More to Improve Patient Safety

Editor’s Note: In this article, Michael Wong, JD (Founder/Executive Director, Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety) remembers Gina Pugliese and remembers how she pushed him to do more for patient safety.

By Michael Wong, JD (Founder/Executive Director, Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety)

It is with great sadness that I learned that Gina Pugliese passed away on March 4, 2019, after a long battle with cancer.

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Respiratory Compromise, Sepsis

Should We Be Watching a Stopwatch or Wanting Better Patient Care? – The Debate over the 1-Hour Sepsis Bundle

Editor’s Note: This editorial from the desk of PPAHS’s Executive Director asks whether the debate over the 1-hour sepsis bundle should focus on improving care and not on making sure certain procedures are done within a 60-minute timeframe.

By Michael Wong, JD (Founder and Executive Director, Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety)

The recent kerfuffle over the 1-Hour Sepsis Bundle has missed the point about the need for better patient care and a much needed effort to save patient lives.

In 2002, the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine, the Society of Critical Care Medicine, and the International Sepsis Forum came together and formed the Surviving Sepsis Campaign aiming to reduce sepsis-related mortality by 25% within 5 years. The goals of the Surviving Sepsis Campaign were to improve the management of sepsis through a 7-point agenda including:

  • Building awareness of sepsis
  • Improving diagnosis
  • Increasing the use of appropriate treatment
  • Educating healthcare professionals
  • Improving post-ICU care
  • Developing guidelines of care
  • Implementing a performance improvement program

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Sepsis

You May Not Get a Second Chance to Save a Patient’s Life Early Detection and Prompt Treatment of Sepsis A Must Do

Editor’s note – In this article for the DoctorWeighsIn, Michael Wong, JD (Founder and Executive Director, Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety) recounts his meeting with Dr. Ken Rothfield that led to the making of the video, “5 Keys to Reducing Sepsis.”

By Michael Wong, JD (Founder and Executive Director, Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety)

According to the CDC, each year in the U.S., more than 1.5 million Americans will develop sepsis and at least 250,000 Americans will die from sepsis. Although these numbers may be staggering, they may not hit home until sepsis strikes a loved one, a friend, or even yourself.

For me, it struck when Dr. Ken Rothfield and I met at a healthcare conference. Dr. Rothfield is Chief Medical Officer at Medical City Dallas, which is operated by the Hospital Corporation of America. He is also a member of the advisory board of the Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety (PPAHS), a non-profit advocacy group that I founded more than seven years ago, and has been a strong advocate for and partner in patient safety. He told me at the conference, “I almost died from sepsis.”

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Must Reads

Raising Smoking Age to 100 – Should Education or Legislation Be Used to Better Healthcare? Articles PPAHS have been reading the week February 4, 2019

Editor’s note: In this editorial from the desk of PPAHS’s Executive Director, the proposed Hawaii bill to raise the legal age to buy cigarettes to 100 years raises the question – “To Educate or Legislate Better Healthcare?”

Hawaii State Representative Richard Creagan recently proposed a state bill that would have raised the legal age to buy cigarettes in the State of Hawaii to 100 years:

The new bill, HB 1509, suggests that the smoking age should go up to 30 in 2020, 40 in 2021, 50 in 2022, and 60 in 2023 – until finally, in 2024, people would need to be 100 years old to buy cigarettes.

Although the bill was “shelved” for the 2019 legislative period in a unanimous vote, the efforts by Dr. Creagan raise the question – “To Educate or Legislate Better Healthcare?”

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Sepsis

Early Detection of Sepsis Through Monitoring Saves Patient Lives Video Interview with Dr. Ken Rothfield - 5 Keys to Reducing Sepsis

Editor’s Note: In this video interview, Dr. Ken Rothfield urges his fellow clinicians to monitor patients for sepsis. Says Dr. Rothfeld, “patient monitoring can alert you at the earliest possible moment when sepsis is developing.”

Clinical studies have found mortality is significantly reduced if septic patients are identified at early stages of the disease process. Anand Kumar, MD (Critical Care Medicine, Health Sciences Centre/St. Boniface Hospital, University of Manitoba) and his colleagues in “Duration of hypotension before initiation of effective antimicrobial therapy is the critical determinant of survival in human septic shock” found in their research that early detection and treatment of sepsis is akey to reduced morbidity and mortality:

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Must Reads

3 New Clinical Guidelines To Take Note of Articles PPAHS have been reading the week January 28, 2019

Editor’s note: In this week’s must reads, we look at 3 new clinical guidelines and consider their impact on patient care.

Guideline for the Management of Patients With Atrial Fibrillation

The newly released “Guideline for the Management of Patients With Atrial Fibrillation” is a game changer for the use of anticoagulants. In a report by the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Clinical Practice Guidelines and the Heart Rhythm Society, in Collaboration With the Society of Thoracic Surgeons, newer anticoagulants, known as non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants (NOACs), are recommended over the traditional warfarin to prevent stroke in people with atrial fibrillation (AFib).

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Sepsis

5 Keys to Reducing Sepsis PPAHS Releases Video Interview with Dr. Ken Rothfield

Editor’s Note: In this video interview, Dr. Ken Rothfield urges his fellow clinicians about the need for early detection and treatment of sepsis. Says Dr. Rothfeld, “I would like you to commit to to early detection and treatment of sepsis, because you may not get a second chance to save your patient’s life.”

The Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety (PPAHS) is pleased to release a video interview with Dr. Ken Rothfield. Dr. Rothfield is Chief Medical Officer at Medical City Dallas, which is operated by the Hospital Corporation of America. Dr. Rothfield is not only a doctor, but he developed sepsis following hernia surgery. So, Dr. Rothfield has the unique perspective of knowing sepsis from the point of view of a doctor and a patient.

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Opioid Safety

Clinicians’ Roles in the Opioid Epidemic Articles PPAHS have been reading the week January 21, 2019

Editor’s note: In this week’s must reads, we look at articles that discuss the role of clinicians in the opioid epidemic.

Last week, we posted the article, “Is this the Right Question to Ask – Who’s to Blame for the Opioid Epidemic?” In that editorial, we applauded the efforts of the Massachusetts Attorney General in seeking to fine culpability and responsibility for the opioid epidemic. A lawsuit filed by the state of Massachusetts against Purdue Pharma alleges that the company, the Sackler family (which controls Purdue), and Purdue executives misled doctors and patients about the potential addictive qualities of opioids and, in particular, OxyContin, which Purdue manufactures.

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Patient Safety

Is this the Right Question to Ask – Who’s to Blame for the Opioid Epidemic? From the Desk of PPAHS’s Executive Director

Editor’s note: In this editorial from the desk of the Executive Director of the Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety, Michael Wong, JD discusses the the recent documents disclosed in the State of Massachusetts against Purdue Pharma and asks whether this is right question to ask – “Who’s to Blame for the Opioid Epidemic?”

By Michael Wong, JD (Founder and Executive Director, Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety

A lawsuit filed by the state of Massachusetts against Purdue Pharma alleges that the company, the Sackler family (which controls Purdue), and Purdue executives misled doctors and patients about the potential addictive qualities of opioids and, in particular, OxyContin, which Purdue manufactures.

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Patient Safety

Fire Prevention Tips for Patient Healthcare Safety

Editor’s Note: In this guest post, Emily Bartels reminds us of the need to prevent fires in healthcare facilities. She discusses fire prevention tips to improve patient safety.

By Emily Bartels

Fires happen in healthcare facilities at times, but, you can always prevent them from happening.  Here, you’ll learn of the top fire prevention tips for the health and safety of patients in a facility, and what you can do to help rectify any dangers.

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