Opioid Safety

Detection of Opioid-Induced Respiratory Depression Through Continuous Electronic Monitoring ATS Conference "where today’s science meets tomorrow’s care"

The theme of this year’s American Thoracic Society annual conference was “where today’s science meets tomorrow’s care.” In keeping with that theme, we would like to highlight one poster on detection of opioid-induced respiratory depression through continuous electronic monitoring. To view a copy of the poster, please go to the ATS website or see an image of the poster below.

“Measuring vital signs every four hours is an outdated and dangerous practice. Patients on our hospital wards deserve continuous vital sign monitoring so they are not found ‘dead in bed,’” said Dr. Frank Overdyk, a Charleston-based anesthesiologist and expert on respiratory compromise. Dr. Overdyk is also a member of our board of advisors.

The study analyzed 6,590 hospitalization days and detected 91 events of respiratory depression. The positive predictive value of 70% of events were classified as respiratory depression or sleep apnea related. Additionally, the study indicated a very low false alarm rate – less than one in 5,000 hours of monitoring, translating to just one false alarm every seven months The study also covered a range of care units and highlighted the variance in incidence rate. Long term care units had the lowest incidence rate of respiratory depression, while post-op units had the highest. Please see an image of the poster presented at the ATS conference:

Detection of Opioid-Induced Respiratory Depression Through Continuous Electronic Monitoring

Detection of Opioid-Induced Respiratory Depression Through Continuous Electronic Monitoring

“One of the key complications resulting from opioid use in hospitalized patients is respiratory distress that can lead to ICU transfers and sadly, even death. Moreover, respiratory depression is a key risk factor across the healthcare continuum, from hospitals to skilled nursing facilities,” explained Michael Wong, JD, Executive Director of The Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety (PPAHS). “For this reason, all patients receiving opioids should be continuously electronically monitored, to help provide early detection of the risk of respiratory depression and enable timely intervention.”

 

Opioid Safety, Respiratory Compromise

Continuous Monitoring Could Have Saved Lorrie McComb’s Life $3.2 million malpractice lawsuit a reminder of need for patient monitoring

$3.2 million in a malpractice suit was awarded against Kennestone Hospital and WellStar Medical Group for the 2012 death Lorrie McComb. Continuous monitoring could have saved her life.

By Michael Wong, JD (Founder and Executive Director, Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety)

“Had Lorrie McComb been monitored with pulse oximetry and capnography, she might be alive today” – this was my first thought when I recently read the article, “Widower gets $3.2 million in hospital suit against WellStar”.

A jury awarded Lorrie McComb’s husband more than $3.2 million in a malpractice suit brought against Kennestone Hospital and WellStar Medical Group for the 2012 death of his wife, Lorrie McComb.

The ruling and the reward of more than $3.2 million should be a reminder to all hospital executives and risk managers of the perils of not following adequate patient monitoring practices.

To read the complete article on TheDoctorWeighsIn, please click here.

 

Opioid Safety, Patient Safety, Respiratory Compromise

We Need to Focus on Patient Safety to Battle the Opioid Epidemic: 5 Key Steps to a More Balanced Approach

Though much of the attention to end the opioid epidemic is centered on the improper use of opioids in the community (misuse, diversion, etc), the truth is that opioid harm exists across a continuum of care. The safe use of opioids begins with the safe use of opioid analgesics in the hospital setting and the prescription of opioids upon discharge of the patient from a healthcare facility. We must first and foremost make sure that opioids provided to patients are done so in a safe manner both during administration and upon discharge.

By Michael Wong, JD (Founder and Executive Director, Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety)

Opioid-related deaths are a leading national and community concern. Unfortunately, reports of opioid-related deaths occur with astonishing regularity in our daily news feeds.

Though much of the attention on opioid-related harm is centered on the improper use of opioids in the community (misuse, diversion, etc), the truth is that opioid harm exists across a continuum of care. The safe use of opioids begins with the safe use of opioid analgesics in the hospital setting and the prescription of opioids upon discharge of the patient from a healthcare facility. We must first and foremost make sure that opioids provided to patients are done so in a safe manner both during administration and upon discharge. Read More

Must Reads

Patient Safety Weekly Must Reads (April 29, 2017)

This week in #patientsafety, PPAHS featured a new report by the Respiratory Compromise Institute on preventing respiratory compromise. From around the web, a study shows voluntary participation in checklists can reduce post-surgery deaths, a look at the demographics of opioid use, and a look at challenges faced by CIOs in improving opioid safety. Read More

Must Reads

Top 10 Patient Safety Must Reads – August 2016

We’re saying goodbye to August with a roundup of PPAHS’ most popular posts and tweets of articles we’ve read.

Top Posts

This month’s published content is highlighted by its insightful guest and collaboration posts. For any who have read our content and want to contribute their opinions on matters of patient safety, reach out to us in the comments, on Twitter, or our Contact Page. Read More

Patient Safety, Respiratory Compromise

Quality Healthcare is a Continuum: PPAHS Interview of Peggy Lange, RT on Intermittent vs. Continuous Monitoring

In a recent interview with Peggy Lange, RT (Director of the Respiratory Care Department, St. Cloud Hospital) conducted by the Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety (PPAHS), Ms. Lange discussed why intermittent monitoring does not foster quality patient care.

St. Cloud Hospital is a 489-bed hospital serving a 12-county area in Central Minnesota. Said Ms. Lange, “St. Cloud Hospital has a long tradition of caring for patients in Central Minnesota. We were founded by the sisters of the order of St. Benedict in 1886 and have grown to a high quality regional medical center.” Read More

Patient Safety, Respiratory Compromise

Improving Health and Safety Without Alarm Fatigue: Nursing Survey Shows Satisfaction with Continuous Patient Monitoring

A recent survey of nurses has found that continuous patient monitoring of patient vital signs may not only improve health and safety, but may be done without associated alarm fatigue.

Terri Watkins MSN, Lynn Whisman BSN, MBA, FACHE and Pamela Booker MSN, CNOR, all clinicians from LifePoint Health, conducted a survey to assess nursing experience with continuous patient monitoring in two medical/surgical units – a 49-bed acute care facility in Utah and a 175-bed full-service hospital in Alabama.

Read More

Patient Safety

Survey on Nursing and Monitoring for Respiratory Compromise: Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety Invites Nurses to Participate

Researchers at the Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety (PPAHS) invite nurses to participate in an anonymous, secure, online survey about hospital monitoring of patients with respiratory compromise – https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/Nursing-Monitoring

“As a practicing professional, nurses have valuable knowledge and experiences to share that can inform PPAHS policy and education initiatives,” said Michael Wong, JD (Executive Director, PPAHS). “The survey takes less than 10 minutes to complete and provides nurses with the opportunity to share your thoughts and perceptions. Read More

Must Reads, Opioid Safety, Respiratory Compromise

Weekly Must Reads in Patient Safety (Feb 20, 2015)

There are great benefits to continuously monitoring patients. As members of the National Coalition to Promote Continuous Monitoring of Patients on Opioids, we admit that we have our biases.

However, two “must reads” support our position on continuous monitoring. Read More

Alarm Fatigue, Blood Clots, Hospital Acquired Conditions, Must Reads, Opioid Safety, Respiratory Compromise

Weekly Must Reads in Patient Safety (Jan 9, 2015)

The Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety wishes you and your loved ones a Happy and SAFE New Year!

Safety first

We particularly emphasize SAFE, because the latest news on patient safety shows that there is a lot work yet to be done … or perhaps we haven’t started? … Read More