Opioid Safety, Patient Stories, Respiratory Compromise

Would Real-Time Monitoring Have Saved Leah?

Real time monitoring of the adequacy of ventilation (i.e. how much carbon dioxide a patient breathes out) could saved Leah’s life.

by Michael Wong

Real time monitoring of the adequacy of ventilation (i.e. how much carbon dioxide a patient breathes out) could save patients’ lives, recent research suggests.

Just ask Lenore Alexander, whose daughter Leah had elective surgery for pectus carinatum, a fairly common condition where the sternum protrudes forward caused by an overgrowth of cartilage. Read More

Patient Stories, Respiratory Compromise

Ensuring child safety during common medical procedures

by Michael Wong

The safety of children could be at risk when they undergo common procedures involving sedation, such as for fracture reduction, laceration repair, and incision and drainage of an abscess.

As a recent study published in Pediatric Emergency Care found, 72% of the episodes of prolonged hypoxia were preceded by decreases in ETco2 as measured by capnography. This suggests that the use of capnography would enhance patient safety by decreasing the frequency of hypoxia during sedation in children. A capnograph is monitoring device that measures the concentration of carbon dioxide that a person breathes out in exhaled air and displays on a numerical readout and waveform tracing. (The capnograph used in this study was provided on loan by Nellcor Purtian Bennett, LLC, doing business as Covidien.) Read More