Opioid Safety, Patient Stories, Respiratory Compromise

Physician-Patient Alliance Recommends Continuous Respiratory Monitoring of All Patients Receiving Opioids

The Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety today issued the following statement encouraging the continuous electronic monitoring of all patients receiving opioids:

To improve patient safety and save patients’ lives, we recommend adopting continuous respiratory monitoring of all patients receiving opioids with pulse oximetry for oxygenation and with capnography for adequacy of ventilation to improve timely recognition of respiratory depression, decompensation or clinical deterioration.

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Opioid Safety, Respiratory Compromise

Open Letter for Patient Safety and Use of Continuous Electronic Monitoring

In the story, “Hypoxia After Surgery Much More Common Than Previously Believed — Study finds high rate of prolonged bouts of desaturation on wards” (Anesthesiology News, March), Daniel Sessler, MD (Michael Cudahy Professor & Chair, Department of Outcomes Research, The Cleveland Clinic; Director, Outcomes Research Consortium) who helped conduct the study, described its results as “sobering.” Read More

Opioid Safety, Patient Stories, Respiratory Compromise

Does CMS Proposed Measure for PCA Safety Go Far Enough?

by Michael Wong

(This article is reprinted with the permission of Patient Safety & Quality Healthcare (PSQH).)

This is the question that I have been asking myself ever since Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) recently announced proposed quality measures it is considering for adoption through rule making for the Medicare program. Read More

Patient Stories, Respiratory Compromise

Yes, Real-Time Monitoring Would Have Saved Leah

Lenore Alexander tells the story of her daughter Leah, whose life might have been saved had she been continuously electronically monitored.

by Lenore Alexander, active member of Mothers Against Medical Errors

“Would real-time monitoring have saved Leah?”

That is one of the many questions that I have asked myself every day since I found my daughter, Leah, dead in her hospital bed. Read More

Opioid Safety, Patient Stories, Respiratory Compromise

Would Real-Time Monitoring Have Saved Leah?

Real time monitoring of the adequacy of ventilation (i.e. how much carbon dioxide a patient breathes out) could saved Leah’s life.

by Michael Wong

Real time monitoring of the adequacy of ventilation (i.e. how much carbon dioxide a patient breathes out) could save patients’ lives, recent research suggests.

Just ask Lenore Alexander, whose daughter Leah had elective surgery for pectus carinatum, a fairly common condition where the sternum protrudes forward caused by an overgrowth of cartilage. Read More