Respiratory Compromise

Healthcare Leaders Meet on Respiratory Compromise To Improve Patient Safety and Save Lives

Respiratory compromise is the second-most frequently occurring preventable patient safety issue and causes higher mortality rates, longer hospital and ICU stays, and millions of healthcare dollars every single year. It is the third most rapidly increasing hospital inpatient cost in the United States. Respiratory compromise consists of respiratory insufficiency, distress, arrest, and failure.

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Blood Clots

IPC To Prevent Blood Clots in Stroke Patients Recommended at International Stroke Conference

Presenting at a standing-room-only meeting at the recent International Stroke Conference (ISC), health experts recommended shortened door-to-treatment times and the use of intermittent pneumatic compression (IPC) to help prevent deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) in stroke patients. Read More

Blood Clots

Recommendations for Reducing Death and Disability among Stroke Victims to be released at International Stroke Conference 2015

Guidelines Poised to Change Standard of Care for Stroke Treatment and Help Caregivers Lower Incidences of Venous Thromboembolism (VTE) in Ischemic and Hemorrhagic Stroke Patients Read More

Hospital Acquired Conditions

Three Steps to Limiting Liability to Facility-Acquired Pressure Ulcers

The Risk Management Quarterly, the peer-reviewed journal for The Association for Healthcare Risk Management recently published in its Risk Management Quarterly Journal-Volume I 2015 Edition the article by Scott Buchholz, Esq. (Dummit, Buchholz & Trapp) and Michael Wong, JD, (executive director, Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety) three practical tips for healthcare facilities to improve patient safety (i.e. follow protocols) and increase patient satisfaction (i.e. communicate effectively with patients).

To read the article in its entirety, please RMQ Article-Buchholz & Wong.

Respiratory Compromise

Medical standards of care and the Joan Rivers death

By Michael Wong, JD (Executive Director, Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety), Frank Overdyk, MSEE, MD  (Professor of Anesthesiology, Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine), Lynn Razzano, RN, MSN, ONCC (Clinical Nurse Consultant, Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety), Kenneth P. Rothfield, MD, MBA (Chairman of the Department of Anesthesiology at Ascension Health’s Saint Agnes Hospital, Baltimore; Adjunct Associate Professor of Nursing at the University of Maryland; soon assuming role of System Chief Medical Officer, St. Vincent’s Healthcare)

When medical tragedies occur, one of the very first questions asked by patients, families, the legal system, the press, and the public is: “were appropriate care standards met?” Read More

Opioid Safety, Patient Stories, Respiratory Compromise

Campaign to Promote Continuous Monitoring of Patients Receiving Opioids

The Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety enthusiastically applauds the Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation (AAMI) Foundation’s newly launched campaign to promote continuous monitoring of all patients receiving opioid analgesics to manage their pain. Read More

Opioid Safety, Respiratory Compromise

Open Letter for Patient Safety and Use of Continuous Electronic Monitoring

In the story, “Hypoxia After Surgery Much More Common Than Previously Believed — Study finds high rate of prolonged bouts of desaturation on wards” (Anesthesiology News, March), Daniel Sessler, MD (Michael Cudahy Professor & Chair, Department of Outcomes Research, The Cleveland Clinic; Director, Outcomes Research Consortium) who helped conduct the study, described its results as “sobering.” Read More

Opioid Safety, Respiratory Compromise

4 Lessons Learned from the Death of Joan Rivers

By Kenneth P. Rothfield, M.D., M.B.A., Chairman, Department of Anesthesiology, Saint Agnes Hospital (Baltimore, MD), Lynn Razzano, RN, MSN, ONCC (Clinical Nurse Consultant, Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety), and Michael Wong, JD (Executive Director, Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety)

It is often said that a death is meaningful if it serves as lessons for others to learn from and increase awareness so they “speak up” when found in a similar situation. So, what can be learned from the death of Joan Rivers? Read More