Alarm Fatigue, Blood Clots, Hospital Acquired Conditions, Must Reads, Opioid Safety, Patient Safety, Patient Stories, Practices & Tips, Respiratory Compromise

Weekly Must-Reads in Patient Safety and Health Care (November 6, 2015) – When False Alarms Pollute Intensive Care

We have plenty of patient safety articles to share with you this week. From advice for nurses on how to educate patients about opioid diversion to tips for preventing medical errors in long-term care, audiences across the health care spectrum will benefit from some weekend reading.
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Blood Clots

Preventing Blood Clots in Pregnant Mothers: PPAHS Releases Web-Enabled Application of OB VTE Safety Recommendations

The risk of blood clots in pregnant mothers is almost ten times more likely than a non-pregnant woman.

To help prevent blood clots in pregnant mothers, the Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety (PPAHS) has released a web-enabled application of the OB VTE Safety Recommendations. The OB VTE application can be found at http://recommendations.ppahs.org/account/login Read More

Must Reads, Patient Safety

Patient Safety and Health Care Newsletter – August 2015

5 Key Patient Safety Achievements!

On July 27, 2015, the Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety (PPAHS) turned four years old.

Turning four years old made us look back and see what we’ve done. These 5 Key Patient Safety Achievements stand out! Read More

Blood Clots

Keeping Pregnant Mothers Safe from Blood Clots: Managing the Health Care Risk in Obese Patients

Preventing blood clots in pregnant mothers poses significant health care challenges. The risk of blood clots in pregnant mothers is almost ten times more likely than a non-pregnant woman. These patient safety risks increase for pregnant mothers who are obese. In the United States, more than two-thirds of adults are obese. Read More

Blood Clots

Preventing Blood Clots in Pregnancy: A Podcast with Maternal/Perinatal Patient Safety Expert Colleen Lee

“Preventing Blood Clots in Pregnancy” – a podcast on the heightened risk of blood clots in pregnant women, the use of simple devices like sequential compression devices to help prevent blood clots, and the role of the OB VTE Safety Recommendations – is now available at the Physician-Patient Alliance For Heath & Safety YouTube channel at http://bit.ly/1He3MLy

On iTunes, the podcast is available at https://itunes.apple.com/ca/podcast/physician-patient-alliance/id897887688?mt=2 Read More

Blood Clots, Hospital Acquired Conditions, Must Reads, Opioid Safety

Weekly Must Reads in Patient Safety (March 20, 2015)

Three main issues in this week’s must reads.

… but, first, a parent’s plight with alarm fatigue – it doesn’t just affect caregivers. If you don’t believe that, then this first-hand account from the parent of a sick baby should change the mind of any doubters that alarm fatigue is real – 14 days of muting and ignoring alarms.

1. March is DVT/Blood Clot Awareness Month

Hats off to @ClotBuster and to @LiverWife for tweeting that March is DVT/Blood ClotAwareness Month! Read More

Blood Clots

Incorporating OB VTE Safety Recommendations during Electronic Transitions

By Lisa Enslow, MSN, RN-BC (Nurse Educator, Women’s Health and Ambulatory Care Services, Hartford Hospital) and Lynn Razzano, RN, MSN, ONCC (Clinical Nurse Consultant, Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety)

[Editor’s note: PPAHS is web-enabling the OB VTE Safety Recommendations. If you are interested in the web-enabled version, please download the OB VTE Safety Recommendations to add your name to the contact list by going here: http://www.ppahs.org/ob-vte-safety-recommendations-pdf/]

The use of electronic medical records (EMR) is no longer an option, but a necessity in today’s healthcare environment. Many institutions are in the process of transitioning from paper to electronic documentation or upgrading to systems that manage records from one institution to another. Read More

Blood Clots, Must Reads, Opioid Safety, Respiratory Compromise

Weekly Must Reads in Patient Safety (Jan 30, 2015)

At a conference, clinicians were arguing about the use of technology – some wanted to use it, others wanted to wait until something better came along. The latter group was willing to risk ore adverse events and deaths, while “waiting” it out … although one wonders if they would feel this way if the life of a loved one was on the line …

We think we should make the best use of what we have and save lives now.

To improve patient safety, perhaps we just need to get smarter. Read More