Patient Safety

How to Select the Best Patient Monitoring Systems

We are often asked how to select the best patient monitoring systems.

To help with the decision making process, we offer two resources:

  • In a clinical education podcast, “Selecting Patient Monitoring Systems,” Melissa Powell (Chief Operating Officer, The Allure Group); Priyanka Shah (Project Engineer, ECRI Institute); and Charlie Whelan (Director of Consulting, Transformational Health, Frost & Sullivan) provide their guidance on how to select the best patient monitoring systems to meet your clinical needs.
  • The Guide to Patient Monitoring features these manufacturers’ answers about their patient monitoring systems:
    • Becton Dickinson
    • EarlySense
    • GE Healthcare
    • Masimo
    • Medtronic – we recently added their answers, so please check it out and tell us what you think!
    • Philips
    • Respiratory Motion
    • Sotera Wireless

To view manufacturer answers, please click here.

If there is a question you’d like answered or a manufacturer that has not been included, please let us know!

 

Patient Safety

Is a Patient’s Life Worth $30 per Day? The Costs of Monitoring and Not Monitoring Patients

When I interviewed Dr. Frank Overdyk for a clinical education podcast, “Preventing Avoidable Deaths” I asked myself this question, “Is a Patient’s Life Worth $30 per Day?”

Frank Overdyk, MD is an anesthesiologist practicing in Charleston, SC.  He organized two conferences on opioid-induced respiratory depression for the Anesthesia Patient Safety Foundation. Dr. Overdyk also is a member of the advisory board for the Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety.

During the podcast, Dr. Overdyk said that the costs of monitoring patients was between $20 to #30 dollars per day:

“there are estimates that the daily cost of continuous monitoring of a patient for example with a pulse oximetry is on the order of 20 or 30 dollars a day. This does not include the cost implications of staff workflow and some of these other softer costs – indirect costs.”

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Opioid Safety, Patient Safety, Respiratory Compromise

Recommendations for Procedural Sedation Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety Announces Intention to Develop Position Statement

The Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety (PPAHS) announced its intention to develop a position statement on recommendations for procedural sedation.

Michael Wong, JD (Founder and Executive Director, PPAHS) explained that such a position statement on recommendations for procedural sedation would encapsulate guidelines and recommendations from leading medical organizations in Canada and the United States:

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Opioid Safety, Respiratory Compromise

Using Capnography and Recognizing Respiratory Compromise Could Save Patient Lives Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety Releases Clinical Education Podcast with Dr. Jenifer Lightdale

The Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety (PPAHS) released a clinical education podcast, “Using Capnography and Recognizing Respiratory Compromise Could Save Patient Lives.”

The podcast features an interview with Jenifer Lightdale, MPH, MD who is division chief, pediatric gastroenterology and chief quality officer at the Children’s Medical Center at the University of Massachusetts Medical School.

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Must Reads, Patient Safety

8 Ways to Improve Patient Safety and Health Outcomes Articles PPAHS have been reading the week of April 23, 2018

Articles we have been reading this past week of April 23, 2018 discuss eight ways to improve patient safety and health outcomes.

#1 Way to Improve Patient Safety and Health Outcomes- Use Opioid-Sparing Strategies and More Precise Monitoring

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Alarm Fatigue

The Case for Continuous Surveillance Monitoring and Real-Time Analytics

In this article which was published in Healthcare Business Today, Michael Wong, JD (Founder and Executive Director, Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety) makes the case for continuous surveillance monitoring and real-time analytics.

The successful implementation of continuous surveillance monitoring may have substantial patient benefits. Unfortunately, analyzing notifications from individual medical devices, reliance on physical spot checks of patients, and the lack of rules-based advanced analytics to assess a patient’s current condition in real-time or to identify signs of deterioration is a goal that many hospitals and health systems still have not attained.

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Patient Safety, Practices & Tips

Selecting Patient Monitoring Systems Clinical Education Podcast on Wearable, Contact-Free, and Continuous Vital Sign Patient Monitoring

The Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety released a clinical education podcast – Selecting Patient Monitoring Systems.

“We are often asked by our clinical followers what patient monitoring systems that we would recommend,” said Michael Wong, JD (Founder/Executives Director). “To help with their decision making process, we have produced a clinical education podcast to provide some guidance on selecting patient monitoring devices.”

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Opioid Safety, Patient Safety, Respiratory Compromise

Preventing Avoidable Deaths PPAHS Interviews Dr. Frank Overdyk on Preventing Avoidable Deaths & Monitoring For Respiratory Compromise

In a clinical education podcast, Frank Overdyk, MD, who is an anesthesiologist practicing in Charleston, SC, discusses preventing avoidable deaths and the costs of monitoring patients receiving opioids and the costs of not being monitored. It is impossible to predict with 100% accuracy how a particular patient will react when administered an opioid. Continuous patient monitoring, which costs just $20-$30 per day in the case of monitoring with pulse oximetry, is a small price to pay to help prevent avoidable patient deaths.

By Michael Wong, JD (Founder/Executive Director, Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety)

I recently interviewed Frank Overdyk, MD, who is an anesthesiologist practicing in Charleston, SC, about the costs of monitoring patients receiving opioids and the costs of not being monitored. Dr. Overdyk is a member of board of advisors of the Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety and organized the two conferences on opioid-induced respiratory depression (“OIRD”) for the Anesthesia Patient Safety Foundation.

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Patient Safety

Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety to Host Guide to Patient Monitoring, Improved Patient Safety and Outcomes Guide to facilitate implementation and adoption of more patient monitoring in healthcare facilities

Guide to Patient Monitoring, Improved Patient Safety and Outcomes

The Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety (PPAHS) announced that it intends to host a Guide to Patient Monitoring, Improved Patient Safety and Outcomes.

PPAHS has developed a standard set of questions and provided these questions to all manufacturers of patient monitoring equipment of which PPAHS is aware. The Guide will contain answers by the medical affairs department of manufacturers of patient monitoring devices.

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Opioid Safety, Respiratory Compromise

Columbia University Medical Center Webinar on Respiratory Compromise Prevention, Recognition and Intervention Clinicians at Columbia University Medical Center offer Their Recommendations for Safer Patient Care

The Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety (PPAHS) is pleased to announce that the Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) webinar on respiratory compromise prevention, recognition and intervention is now available on the PPAHS YouTube Channel.

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