Blood Clots

Preventing Blood Clots in Pregnant Mothers: PPAHS Releases Web-Enabled Application of OB VTE Safety Recommendations

The risk of blood clots in pregnant mothers is almost ten times more likely than a non-pregnant woman.

To help prevent blood clots in pregnant mothers, the Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety (PPAHS) has released a web-enabled application of the OB VTE Safety Recommendations. The OB VTE application can be found at http://recommendations.ppahs.org/account/login Read More

Patient Safety

Weekly Must Reads in Patient Safety and Health Care (August 21, 2015)

Two lessons learned for this week’s must reads in patient safety and health care – (1) Monitor with Capnography to Improve Patient Safety and (2) Planning Helps Manage the Health Care Risk in Obese Pregnant Mothers. Read More

Blood Clots

Preventing Blood Clots in Pregnancy: A Podcast with Maternal/Perinatal Patient Safety Expert Colleen Lee

“Preventing Blood Clots in Pregnancy” – a podcast on the heightened risk of blood clots in pregnant women, the use of simple devices like sequential compression devices to help prevent blood clots, and the role of the OB VTE Safety Recommendations – is now available at the Physician-Patient Alliance For Heath & Safety YouTube channel at http://bit.ly/1He3MLy

On iTunes, the podcast is available at https://itunes.apple.com/ca/podcast/physician-patient-alliance/id897887688?mt=2 Read More

Blood Clots

Joan Rivers’ Death & Safety Considerations for Outpatient Surgery & Pregnant Mothers

Lynn Razzano, RN, MSN, ONCC (Clinical Nurse Consultant, Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety) wrote about the safety considerations for outpatient surgery that we can learn from the recent death of comedienne Joan Rivers: Read More

Blood Clots, Must Reads, Opioid Safety, Respiratory Compromise

Weekly Must Reads in Patient Safety (Jan 30, 2015)

At a conference, clinicians were arguing about the use of technology – some wanted to use it, others wanted to wait until something better came along. The latter group was willing to risk ore adverse events and deaths, while “waiting” it out … although one wonders if they would feel this way if the life of a loved one was on the line …

We think we should make the best use of what we have and save lives now.

To improve patient safety, perhaps we just need to get smarter. Read More