Patient Safety

Pressure Ulcer Prevention Tools Presented At ASHRM Conference

At a recent meeting of the New Jersey chapter of the American Society for Healthcare Risk Management (ASHRM), health experts presented on how to prevent readmissions for pressure ulcers.

Pressure ulcers are a common hospital-acquired condition with far-reaching implications for patient safety.  It is estimated that 2.5 million patients are affected by pressure ulcers annually in the U.S.; about 60,000 patients will die nationwide directly from pressure ulcers.  The condition is extremely painful, costly (up to $11 billion each year in the U.S. alone), and largely preventable. Read More

Hospital Acquired Conditions

Pressure Ulcers (Part 2): The Risks and Root Causes of Bedsores

By Thomas A. Sharon, R.N., M.P.H. (Nursing & Patient Safety Expert, Life Care Plan, Medical Evidence Analysis, Medical Record Review, Legal Nurse Consultant, Litigation Support)

Who is at Risk for Bedsores?

In making the assessment, your admitting nurse must determine whether anyone or more of the following risk factors exist:

Read More

Hospital Acquired Conditions

Pressure Ulcers (Part 1): Zero Tolerance for Bedsores

By Thomas A. Sharon, R.N., M.P.H. (Nursing & Patient Safety Expert, Life Care Plan, Medical Evidence Analysis, Medical Record Review, Legal Nurse Consultant, Litigation Support)

Bedsores (also called decubitus ulcers, pressure sores, or pressure ulcers) are the breakdown of skin resulting from excessive pressure that cuts off blood circulation. Friction burns also cause ulcerations when nursing personnel drag their patients on the sheets while pulling them up in bed. This subject deserves its own chapter because bedsores are one of the most common complications of hospitalization and exist in every hospital and nursing home. Read More

Hospital Acquired Conditions

Bed and/or Chair Rest + Neglect = Bedsores

Brian A. Raphan (Principal Attorney, Law Offices of Brian A. Raphan, P.C.)

Any time a patient is confined to a bed or chair for a period of time and not provided proper and adequate care, the risk of pressure ulcers increases.

The National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (NPUAP) defines a pressure ulcer as a “localized injury to the skin and/or underlying tissue, usually over a bony prominence, as a result of pressure, or pressure in combination with shear.” Illustrations of the stages of pressure ulcers are shown below: Read More

Hospital Acquired Conditions, Must Reads, Opioid Safety, Respiratory Compromise

Weekly Must Reads in Patient Safety (Sep 19, 2014)

As you may be tired of reading about the death of Joan Rivers, we thought that we’d highlight some important practice recommendations instead …

… and then just one article on Joan Rivers. Not only is the article in Gastroenterology & Endoscopy News, but Kenneth P. Rothfield, MD, MBA (chairman of the Department of Anesthesiology at Saint Agnes Hospital) is quoted in this article. Dr Rothfield is on our board of advisors, so we must confess that we are biased towards his passion and commitment to patient safety. Read More

Hospital Acquired Conditions

Reliable Care for Patients at Risk of Hospital Acquired Pressure Ulcers

By Tim Gee (Principal, Medical Connectivity Consulting)

Introduction

Quality health care delivery has never been more achievable. Our knowledge of human physiology, diagnosing and treating disease is comprehensive. The armamentarium of diagnostic tools, therapeutic modalities and patient monitoring capabilities is considerable. So why do adverse and sentinel events continue to plague health care delivery? Read More