Opioid Safety

Patient Safety Weekly Must Reads (May 13, 2017)

This week in #patientsafety, PPAHS featured a video about Tyler, an 18-year-old who survived the surgery for a collapsed lung but not the recovery. He was receiving opioids via PCA pump and was found dead in bed. From around the web, two Canadian patient safety organizations are trying to measure patient harm in hospitals, a biochemist from the University of Colorado looks at NSAIDs and sepsis, and an answer to whether a stroke patient should be driven to the hospital. Read More

Blood Clots, Hospital Acquired Conditions, Must Reads, Opioid Safety

Weekly Must-Reads in Patient Safety and Health Care (October 23, 2015) – Two-Time Stroke Survivor Hopes to Teach Others About F.A.S.T.

This week’s must-reads feature articles about multiple patient safety touchpoints, from an inspiring article about Catherine Zalewski, a 33-year-old mother of two, former Mrs. New Jersey and certified personal trainer, and two-time stroke survivor who is raising awareness for World Stroke Day, to a new report that pharmacist intervention can help reduce readmissions through postdischarge outreach phone calls.

The theme of this week’s must-reads is that patient safety can and is being improved at multiple touchpoints.

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Blood Clots, Patient Safety

Stroke Health Care Expert, Neurologist Mark Alberts Joins Board of Advisors of Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety

Stroke health care expert, neurologist Mark J. Alberts, MD, FAHA joins the Board of Advisors of the Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety (PPAHS).

Dr. Alberts is an internationally recognized leader in the care of stroke patients. He is at the forefront of medical breakthroughs to improve the diagnosis and treatment of stroke, including new methods to treat and prevent strokes. He has been instrumental in developing national criteria for hospitals to become stroke centers. Read More

Blood Clots

Two Steps Can Reduce the Incidence of Secondary Stroke

By Mark Reiter, MD, MBA, FAAEM (CEO, Emergency Excellence; Residency Director, Emergency Medicine Residency, University of Tennessee-Murfreesboro/Nashville; President, American Academy of Emergency Medicine) and Brian Fengler, MD, FAAEM (CEO, EvidenceCare; Assistant Professor, Emergency Medicine Residency, University of Tennessee-Murfreesboro/Nashville).

In their recent article in Practical Neurology, Dr Mark Reiter and Dr Brian Fengler write about the need for better use of venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis to prevent secondary stroke in admitted patients: Read More

Blood Clots

IPC To Prevent Blood Clots in Stroke Patients Recommended at International Stroke Conference

Presenting at a standing-room-only meeting at the recent International Stroke Conference (ISC), health experts recommended shortened door-to-treatment times and the use of intermittent pneumatic compression (IPC) to help prevent deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) in stroke patients. Read More

Blood Clots

New Stroke VTE Safety Recommendations Prevent Blood Clots In Stroke Patients

Health Expert Panel Encourage Use of Venous Thromboembolism Recommendations to Reduce Adverse Events and Save Lives

The Physician-Patient Alliance for Health & Safety is pleased to announce the release of safety recommendations targeting the prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in stroke patients. Read More

Blood Clots

Recommendations for Reducing Death and Disability among Stroke Victims to be released at International Stroke Conference 2015

Guidelines Poised to Change Standard of Care for Stroke Treatment and Help Caregivers Lower Incidences of Venous Thromboembolism (VTE) in Ischemic and Hemorrhagic Stroke Patients Read More

Blood Clots, Must Reads, Respiratory Compromise

Weekly Must Reads in Patient Safety (Oct 10, 2014)

Unnecessary – that’s the word that best summarizes this week’s reads – unnecessary readmissions and unnecessary surgery.

And, then to round out “unnecessary”, new data recently published in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine suggests unnecessary risk. Read More